Category:Buffalo butchering

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English:
  • The traditional Lakota "Buffalo Butchering" or 'breaking of a buffalo' is the conclusion of the pre-20th century Bison hunting, and 20th-21st century Bison farming. Traditionally subsequent to the butchers work, the meat was dryed on outdoor structures, the Bison fur-skins were treated for usability, and removal was done of all other parts that could be eaten or crafted.
  • The two different photo sets here, showing "Buffalo Butchering," were taken over 60 years apart.
20th century
21st century
  • The purpose shown in the second photo collection is an event organized for educational purposes in 2004, to benefit young Oglala Lakota in the traditional ways. It also occurred on the Pine Ridge Reservation. As this collection's photographer tells:
"Invited to a Bufflao Butchering (breaking of a buffalo), in 2004 on the Pine Ridge reservation, South Dakota, USA. A panel of Wanbli community Oglala (Sioux), is organizing a Buffalo Butchering for educational purposes. This is to show young Lakota traditional techniques of carving with a flint blade and distribute the meat among the participants. It is also a ceremony with traditional songs. They eat the liver raw on the spot and the intestines to be prepared in a soup. It will remain only the bones with the exception of the skull that will be used in ceremonies. The "slaughter" is preceded by a presentation of traditional clothing, decoration techniques, (Quill work, beading), tanning and hunting. Dave Baldeagle speak of legends and the days before the reservation."

Français :
  • "Invité à un Bufflao Butchering, (Dépeçage d’un bison), en 2004 sur la réserve de Pine Ridge, South Dakota, USA.
Un collège de Wanbli, communauté Oglala (Sioux), organise un Buffalo Butchering à des fins pédagogiques.
Il s'agit de montrer aux jeunes Lakotas les techniques tradionnelles de dépeçage à l'aide d'une lame en silex et de répartir la viande entre les participants. C'est aussi une cérémonie avec chants traditionnels. On y mangera le foie cru sur place ainsi que les intestins qui seront préparés en soupe. Il ne restera que les os à l’exception du crâne qui lui sera utilisé lors de cerémonies.
La "boucherie" est précédée par une présentation des vêtements traditionnels, des techniques de décoration, (Quill work, perlage), du tannage et de la chasse. Dave Baldeagle parle des légendes et du temps d'avant la réserve."