National Geographic Magazine, June 1917

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Volume 31
  1. January
  2. February
  3. March
  4. April
  5. May
  6. June

This is a list of the images that were published in the June 1917 issue of The National Geographic Magazine (volume 31). Links are provided to the Wikisource articles where the images can be found.

"Reviving a Lost Art"[edit]

Charles Martin and David Fairchild

A CHILD SLICING SWISS-CHARD LEAVES PREPARATORY TO DRYING THEM ON THE STOVE OR SUN DRIER

Great caution must be exercised in the use of any form of slicer, for it will cut fingers as mercilessly as it does vegetables.

Charles Martin and David Fairchild

THE SLICING MACHINE AT WORK

Showing how it cuts potatoes into thin slices and, by putting these slices through again, cuts them into narrow strips, or “shoestrings.”

Charles Martin

THREE LONG, NARROW TRAYS MADE OF FLY SCREEN AND LATHS AND HUNG UP IN A CHEAP SLING OF LATHS AND FENCE WIRE TO THE HOOD OF A KITCHEN STOVE

It is out of the way of the cook's head and utilizes waste heat, and the vegetables put this distance from the top of the stove do not get too hot.

Charles Martin

A TRAY OF DRIED SWISS CHARD TAKEN FROM THE HANGING STOVE DRIER

These, when soaked in water, swell and make excellent greens for soups and stews many months after drying.

Charles Martin and David Fairchild

AN INEXPENSIVE SUN DRIER MADE OF ONE WINDOW SASH, A FEW LATHS, AND SOME METAL FLY SCREEN

By removing one pane of glass a simple ventilator can be made of lath and screen and fitted into place, or, if electricity is available, the drying can be accelerated by keeping a gentle current of air blowing over the fruits or vegetables. Protection from showers is obtained by such a drier and especially delicate fruits can be handled in small quantities under it; larger amounts require more space.

Charles Martin and David Fairchild

SLICING BEETS

The trays are filled with Swiss chard and sliced beets. Both trays and drier itself are made of lath and wire netting.

Charles Martin and David Fairchild

THE HANGING STOVE DRIER SWUNG OVER THE KITCHEN STOVE AFTER THE MEAL HAS BEEN PREPARED

It utilizes heat which otherwise would be wasted. When the stove is required for cooking purposes, the drier can be swung back out of the way by means of the wooden bracket made of lath and attached to the wall by a bent nail and piece of fence wire. An electric fan can be trained on the drier to hasten the drying process. It can be kept running at night when the kitchen stove is cold.

Charles Martin and David Fairchild

THE WATER-TANK DRIER

This has a false bottom and under it water, which is kept hot by the contact of the drier with the back of the stove. In it are leaves of the Chinese cabbage, which are easily and quickly dried on this type of drier. Unless watched, delicate leaves will scorch.

Charles Martin

ONCE DRIED, THE VEGETABLES CAN BE STORED IN PAPER BAGS OR CARTONS

One form of these cartons made of paraffin paper is closed by means of a special instrument, which is heated and spreads the cap into place, thus hermetically sealing the carton.

"Our State Flowers: The Floral Emblems Chosen by the Commonwealths"[edit]

Paintings by Mary E. Eaton

Albert Schlechten

A CLOVER FIELD IN MONTANA

Although thirty-eight of the States have in one way or another expressed their preferences and chosen their flower queens, this is the first attempt that has been made to assemble in a single publication color paintings and descriptions of all the State flowers.

Arkansas and Michigan

APPLE and BLOSSOM
Malus sylvestris Mill.

Minnesota

PINK MOCCASIN FLOWER
Cypripedium acaule Ait.

California

GOLDEN POPPY
Eschscholtzia californica Cham.

Colorado

BLUE COLUMBINE
Aquilegia coerulea James

Connecticut

MOUNTAIN LAUREL
Kalmis latifolia L.

Nevada

SAGEBRUSH
Artemisia tridentata Nutt.

Florida

ORANGE BLOSSOM
Citrus sinensis Osbeck

Montana

BITTER ROOT
Lewisia rediviva Pursh

Illinois, Rhode Island and Wisconsin

THE VIOLET
Viola

Idaho

LEWIS' SYRINGA
Philadelphus lewisii Pursh

Iowa

LOW or PASTURE ROSE
Rosa carolina L. (Rosa humilis Marsh.)

Louisiana and Mississippi

MAGNOLIA
Magnolia grandiflora L.

Delaware (left) and Ohio (right)

PEACH BLOSSOM
Amygdalus persica L.

RED CARNATION
Dianthus caryophyllus L.

Kansas

COMMON SUNFLOWER
Helianthus annuus L.

Kentucky

TRUMPET VINE
Bignonia radicans L.

Indiana

PINK CARNATION
Dianthus caryophyllus L.

Maine

WHITE PINE
Pinus strobus L.

Nebraska

FIELD GOLDENROD
Solidago nemoralis Ait.

Utah

SEGO or MARIPOSA LILY
Calochortus nuttallii Torr. & Gr.

North Carolina

COMMON or OX-EYE DAISY
Chrysanthemum cucanthemum L.

Texas

BLUEBONNET
Lupinus texensis Hook

Arizona

SAHUARO or GIANT CACTUS
Carnegiea gigantea (Engelm.) Britton & Rose

New Mexico

CACTUS
Echinocereus fendleri (Engelm.) Ruempl.

South Dakota

PASQUE FLOWER
Pulsatilla patens (L.) Mill.

Oklahoma

AMERICAN MISTLETOE
Phoradendron flavescens (Pursh) Nutt

Wyoming

NARROW-LEAVED INDIAN PAINTBRUSH
Castilleja linariaefolia Benth.

Oregon

OREGON GRAPE
Berberis aquifolium Pursh

Vermont

RED CLOVER
Trifolium pratense L.

West Virginia

MOUNTAIN AMERICAN RHODODENDRON
Rhododendron maximum Michx.

"Our First Alliance"[edit]

"Madonnas of Many Lands"[edit]

International Film Service

A MADONNA OF SORROW AT HER SON'S GRAVE

If the sympathy of the civilized world cannot still the anguish of the moment, the ages to come will venerate such heroic women who taught their sons the highest bravery, the finest courtesy, the loftiest honor—and who gave their all for France.

Der Vereinigten Kunstanst. A.-G.

A MADONNA OF THE MOUNTAINS

In the whirlpool of Europe, Switzerland's political neutrality has kept its balance, and peace of a sort exists within the little democracy's borders. But it is a peace strained by the evidences of war and shot through with thoughts of another little state which had no friendly Alps to guard it—only a treaty and the honor of nations. Mother hearts cannot forget that there are no such idyls as this in Belgium today.

A MADONNA OF SACRIFICE

Wordless reverence is the most fitting tribute to the Mothers of Belgium. May her sole remaining treasure, in the liberated and peace-blessed world of the future, live to realize that in the terrible vision of the present his eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

Garrigues

A BEDOUIN MOTHER AND CHILD

The father of this little nomad may be a warlike bandit with a cloudy notion of property rights and other details of the civilized code; his mother a simple daughter of the desert with a childish curiosity and fondness for gaudy trinkets, but her babe has the divine heritage of mother love as truly as the most fortunate child of our own land.

Eliza R. Scidmore

A MOTHER OF WARRIORS: JAPAN

Stoicism is more than a tenet with the Japanese; it is almost a religion, and the mother of these babes, if the hand of death were laid upon them, could with calm fortitude relate her loss to a stranger without the display of grief, for it is a cardinal principle of her politeness that she should never burden another with her woes. But beneath this cross-barred cradle of cloth there beats the universal mother heart—universal in its high hopes for her children's future and in its eager joy at personal sacrifice for their happiness.

A MADONNA OF THE GREAT PLAINS

The Indian race, in general, has offered resistance to the American “melting pot,” but Indian metal, after proper contact with civilized customs and industries, has gone into the making of many examples of splendid citizenship.

THE BALANCE OF POWER IN CHINA

Borg Mesch

WARM HEARTS OF THE NORTH

The Lapland father may measure his wealth in herds of reindeer, in hides and pelts, but the Lapland mother knows that her bright-eyed, smiling baby and her sturdy two-year-old are the treasures beyond price.

A. B. Lewis

A NEW GUINEA WOMAN AND BABY

This device is at a disadvantage when compared with an American cradle, but it is a touching evidence of maternal inventiveness and industry at work for baby's safety even in the South Seas.

Mrs. Charles K. Moser

YOUNG SOMALI MOTHER AND BABE: ADEN

Even the primitive heart of a Somali woman is instinct with a sense of protection for the innocence and helplessness of a child.

S. J. Spooner

A PATIENT MEXICAN MOTHER

When war for the peace of the world and “for the principles that gave her birth,” is welding the great heart of America into high-purposed unity, she must needs feel a deep pity for the mothers and children of distracted Mexico, and a just indignation that their burden of poverty and distress has been increased by selfish Prussian intrigue.

Hon. Belisario Porras

INDIAN MOTHER AND BABE: PANAMA

The Cuna-Cuna, or Tule Indians of the San Blas coast of Panama, are of the purest aboriginal strain. For hundreds of years they have resisted amalgamation, and woe to the Cuna-Cuna belle who looks with favor upon a “foreign” lover. They are an intelligent race and are not savages by any means—even though nose rings are a part of the adornment of all members of the gentler sex, who wear them from the time they begin to walk.

Alexander Graham Bell

MOTHER AND CHILD IN CEYLON

ln spite of the white man's improvements, the climate of Ceylon is not merciful to baby dwellers in “the Half-way House of the East”; but the little brown natives are merry and bright-eyed, nevertheless. Life is sweet; although, of course, much sweeter when one has a bit of palm sugar to suck.

Harriet Chalmers Adams

MOTHERHOOD IN THE PHILIPPINES

He doesn't know that, after his mother, Uncle Sam is his best friend. Had he belonged to an earlier generation his childhood would have been spent at work in the fields until he was old enough to join father in head-hunting. Under American direction, the future probably holds for him an education and a respectable career as a farmer or as a member of the native police. At present he is just a healthy little Ifugao; mother's back is a warm and comfortable reality—and “Who is Uncle Sam, anyway?”

D. W. Iddings

A HUNGARIAN GYPSY MOTHER AND CHILD—AT HOME

Neither the poets who have celebrated the gypsy passion for freedom and the open road, nor the ethnologists who have studied the mysterious origin of the race have offered an explanation of the Romany's lack of that almost universal quality—a love for home.

George R. King

AN ESKIMO FAMILY

Tenderness and responsibility in their treatment of children is a virtue of the Eskimo which binds them closer to the brotherhood of civilized peoples than their skill at carving or with the needle.

"Our Second Alliance"[edit]

Underwood & Underwood

MARSHAL JOFFRE UNVEILS THE MEMORIAL TO LAFAYETTE IN PROSPECT PARK, BROOKLYN

Americans, as long as the United States endures, will reverence the name of Lafayette, who, though inheriting immense wealth and, as head of one of the oldest and most distinguished families, assured of an influential career in France, deliberately abandoned the advantages of birth to fight in our country for the liberation of mankind.

"The Conversion of Old Newspapers and Candle Ends Into Fuel"[edit]

Photographs by Charles Martin and Ethel M. Bagg

ROLLING AND PASTING RATION HEATERS AT HOME

CUTTING THE NEWSPAPER ROLLS AND MELTING THE CANDLE ENDS

A SOLDIER BOILING HIS RATION OVER THE HOME-MADE RATION HEATERS

Three of these little rolls of paper, no larger than a spool of silk, saturated with hot paraffin and allowed to cool, will burn without smoke, which in the presence of the enemy is dangerous, and will boil a pint of soup in about ten minutes and keep lighted for twenty minutes or half an hour. By supporting the can of soup on pieces of rock and protecting the flames from the wind an ideal individual camp meal can be made.