User:Bdcousineau/Sandbox1

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2nd version below. Bdcousineau (talk) 22:55, 9 May 2013 (UTC)

Cloud GLAM

Introduction: Big Data is part of an ongoing conversation in many circles, and we can watch in real-time as gigantic linked repositories are created. Cloud-based cultural heritage institutions (GLAM – Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums), while not new, are proliferating and create opportunities for on-site curation and research; in fact on-site use is the most encouraged use.

Questions: But what happens when the metadata and objects are moved off-site to a different high-traffic location? Will the materials see more widespread use? How will the use on the source site compare with the use on the receiving site? Will the objects act like a trail of crumbs, leading new users back to the original repository?

A group of Wikimedians decided to find out.

Background: The Digital Public Library of America, a big data aggregator, is a national digital public library that provides open access to digitized and born digital content from a variety of providers. As of April 2013 content providers include the Smithsonian Institution, the National Archives and Records Administration, ARTstor, the New York Public Library, the Biodiversity Heritage Library, University of Virginia, and others. Linked regional content hubs include digital libraries from Georgia, Kentucky, Minnesota, South Carolina, Oregon and the Mountain West.

The DPLA provides metadata and media content of all types from its providers and hubs, as well as tools for download. The DPLA also serves as a community platform for its users. The DPLA encourages the creation of apps for the site, and has a basic search structure.

Metadata aggregators like the DPLA will change the landscape for Wikimedia Commons, as the open source, free metadata make it possible for bot operators and others to access the digital files on a direct, as needed basis, much like a traditional lending library. Formerly, metadata was available by request and cooperation arrangement – the DPLA allows users to “borrow” the metadata at will.

Team and process: The Wikimedians* (a bot operator, a recent Wikipedian-in-Residence, and a GLAM professional) are prepping the transfer of over 500k public domain records from the DPLA to Wikimedia Commons. It is estimated that the download will take the bot 24/7/30 days. Preparations include: templating, categorizing, community consensus, etc. Technical notes will be available. You can watch the upload proicess here: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:DPLA. Post-upload, basic metrics (image use, page views, etc) will be used to track traffic both to the referring site (the DPLA) and the recieving site (Wikimedia Commons). The DPLA will also be contaced for metrics as well.


I've since revised this. Will post revisions later this weekend. Bdcousineau (talk) 02:39, 9 May 2013 (UTC)

Cloud GLAM

Big Data is getting even bigger, and creating a series of linked repositories. These cloud cultural heritage institutions (GLAM – Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums) attract opportunities for on-site curation and research; in fact on-site use is the most encouraged use.

But what happens when the metadata and objects are moved to a new high-traffic location?
Will the materials see more widespread use? How will the use on the source site compare with the use on the receiving site?
Will the objects act like a trail of crumbs, leading new users back to the original repository?

A group of Wikimedians decided to find out.

The Digital Public Library of America is a national digital public library providing open access to digitized and born digital content from a variety of providers. As of April 2013 content providers include the Smithsonian Institution, the National Archives and Records Administration, ARTstor, the New York Public Library, the Biodiversity Heritage Library, University of Virginia, and others. Regional content hubs include digital libraries from Georgia, Kentucky, Minnesota, South Carolina, Oregon and the Mountain West.

The DPLA provides metadata and media content of all types from its providers and hubs, as well as tools for download. The DPLA also serves as a community platform for its users.

The launch of the DPLA (April, 2013) is a rare opportunity for Wikipedia and the sister projects, as it allows Wikimedians to collaborate with a major open source, online library as it is being deployed.

Metadata aggregators like the DPLA will change the landscape for Wikimedia Commons, as bot operators and editors no longer need direct participation from GLAM data hosts. The open source, free data will make it possible for bot operators and others to access the digital files on a direct, as needed basis.

The Wikimedians* (the team consists of a bot operator, a recent Wikipedian-in-Residence, and a GLAM professional) are prepping the transfer of over 450k pd records from the DPLA to Wikimedia Commons. It is estimated that the download will take the bot 24/7/30 days. Preparations include: templating, categorizing, community consensus, etc. Technical notes available.