User talk:Codrinb

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TUSC token 259b6bc01efe785e48ac5fbedc421f5e[edit]

I am now proud owner of a TUSC account!

Valued Image Set Promotion[edit]

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A gift[edit]

vectorial drawing after daicovici

No subject[edit]

EDH[edit]

Hello, I didn´t really get it how I have to answer you and I hope you see my message here. I work for EDH (Epigraphische Datenbank Heidelberg) and my boss is selecting fotos of inscriptions and adds them to the Category Withoutlink to EDH from where I get them and work on them. To work on them means to search for this exact inscription on different databases but specially on EDH and if we have it, then I link the foto with the EDH-page. Then I remove the Category (Without Link to EDH) and put a new one - Linke to EDH. At the end my boss can see how many and whitch inscriptions I´ve worked on.

I hope this answers your question.

cheers Denitsa

ArchiveBot[edit]

Hi, I noticed you have set up User:MiszaBot to archive your talk page. Unfortunately, the bot has stopped working, and given how its operator is inactive, it is unclear when/if this will fixed. For the time being, I have volunteered to operate a MiszaBot clone (running the exact same code). With that said, your input would be appreciated at Commons:Bots/Requests/ArchiveBot 1. Regards, FASTILY 07:44, 20 April 2014 (UTC)

Cat-a-lot[edit]

Bună. Am observat ca folosint Cat-a-lot ai început să adaugi categorii pentru imaginile (hărţile de localizare) din categoria Category:Locator maps of cities in Romania (de exemplu, harta de localizare a oraşului Haţeg). Te rog nu te grăbi să le adaugi, pentru că o voi face eu sistematic imediat ce termin de adăugat hărţile de localizare pentru oraşele care lipsesc şi după ce termin categoriile cu oraşele României. Mulţumesc.

Buna. Uneori lucrez la articolele legate de localitati din Romania, si in procesul asta, de obicei strang toate imagine care le pot gasi pe commons pentru o anumite localitate (nu doar harti). Nu ma grabesc cu nimic :-), si ma bucur ca lucrezi sistematic si tu la organizare, dar nu prea inteleg unde ar fi problema. Commons si WP sunt sisteme de colaborare prin definitie, si putem lucra in paralel la diferite aspecte, categorisiri, articole etc. Oricum nu lucrez la Category:Locator maps of cities in Romania in mod specific. --Codrin.B (talk) 16:14, 28 April 2014 (UTC)

File:Eu vorbesc limba moldovenească.jpg[edit]

You're doing political censorship. It is not permissible. --Лобачев Владимир (talk) 11:15, 27 June 2014 (UTC)

I am proposing for deletion politically-loaded, propaganda material in unfree content that you stolen from the internet. Is that censorship to you? What you have done in the 1st place is not permissible.--Codrin.B (talk) 09:32, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

File:AsambleaDeAlbaIulia19181201.jpg[edit]

I've improved it a bit; I suspect it might be wise to upload a copy to en-wiki with Template:Keep Local on it, though. Trying to decide whether to remove the line, or to just hope for a better copy, as removing those sorts of lines from half-toned images can become interestingly difficult. Adam Cuerden (talk) 17:16, 21 July 2014 (UTC)

Stone Mace Head of Decea Muresului Type from Sard[edit]

Hello,

My name is Peter Le Couteur, I’m an artist and researcher doing a PhD at the Royal College of Art in London. I’m very interested in the intersection of sculpture, museology, anthropology and narratives; sculpture here meaning primarily a way of thinking about objects.

I’m writing to you with a question about the small stone toroids classed as “mace heads”. I’m not an archeologist, and so had no idea who best to contact about my question. The image you uploaded to Wikimedia of the Decea Muresului Type from Sard is an excellent example of what I'm interested in, so I thought I would write to you.

In the course of my researches, I saw an artefact in the National Museum in Istanbul, which was labelled as a fragment of a “mace head”. I was a bit suspicious (my research is all about being suspicious in museums) and I assumed the classification was either a) a translation error, or b) a classic case of trying to label an artefact as more exciting than it was. Not possible it’s from a mace, I thought; the haft would have been too narrow to use. And there it was again, in another case, this time flatter and labelled as a 'loom weight', though it was clearly of a different class than the weights it was grouped with.

The funny thing was, I had instantly recognized the class of object from some ethnographic research I’d been doing about pre-industrial tools: it was (I thought) the flywheel weight from a pump drill. An excellent piece of ‘primitive’ technology, and the very same tool – in fact – that was likely used to make the stone’s well-drilled hole in the first place.

I did some digging online, and found that while these objects are found internationally, the “mace head” category seems a bit of a misnomer. These artefacts, labelled "mace heads" since the late 1800s, are classed as decorative because they are absolutely unsuitable as mace heads, and there is longstanding uncertainty about what (if anything) they are actually for.

Rather than being a strangely international, cross-cultural example of a decorative status symbol, each embodying days of skilled, precise labour, I'd argue they are in fact functional components of a highly advanced and practical mechanical tool. Of course, this hypothesis would only apply to examples which have rotational symmetry. Some design elements from particularly interesting examples – such as your image of one from Sard – really become interesting if you imagine them spinning. I'm certainly not suggesting that stone-headed maces did not exist, but that in examples like this, the tiny diameter of the haft in comparison to the weight of the "head" would make the object impossible to use; even ceremonial weapons need to at least look functional!

I’d love to know if there is any contemporary debate / interest about the practical use of “mace heads”, and particularly if anyone has suggested / examined the idea that they represent the only surviving (because non-biodegradable) component of the widespread use of pump drills?

All the best,

Peter

Hello Peter!
Thank you for reaching out with this very interesting topic. I am not an archaeologist either, just someone with passion for history and the "old worlds". Some of my goals and hopes behind these picture contributions to Commons is to make such objects from unknown and underfunded Romanian museums accessible to scientists who can research them.
I couldn't find much around the mace head topic in Wikipedia. Very few things are discussed about the Mace's Prehistory. Probably it would be interesting to read more on the Decea Mureşului culture but most likely there is very little literature, especially in English. Here is some interesting Google Books search results: Decea Mureşului culture mace head, Decea Mureşului culture. Among the hits, I would recommend this really impressive book: The Lost World of Old Europe: The Danube Valley, 5000-3500 BC
Your ideas are fascinating and I wouldn't be surprised if archaeologists misinterpreted the functions of some objects. Worth talking to some of them about your thoughts. The mace head I posted is hosted by the National Museum of the Union in Alba Iulia. I can try to find out the archaeologists involved with it if you want.
I also found this paper by Florin Gogaltan. It covers that mace head and a lot of others I didn't know about, all from Transylvania. Unfortunately it is written in Romanian with a German summary. Google Translate could help and I can to, if you need.
Do you have pictures of the artifact from the Museum of Istanbul? Would be worth posting them to Commons and point archaeologists to them. Maybe there are some connections here.
Best regards!
--Codrin.B (talk) 21:22, 22 November 2014 (UTC)