User talk:Y tambe

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Slow Down Wankel Engine Animation, Please[edit]

Can you make this slower? It goes to fast for me to see what it's doing.

Wankel Cycle anim en.gif

Noldoaran 22:47, 29 March 2006 (UTC)

Hi. I'm sorry but I'm not willing make it slower. Because I'd considered and tried various conditions when I made it. And I concluded that making it slower has some failings; (1) if make it slower without increasing animation frames, the movement get nonsmooth. (2) increasing frames also increase the file size too much (though too large now!) Now I can follow if I confine the attention to only single cell. I hope you could, too ;-)
Since I uploaded the source file (POV-Ray scene file) of this animation on Image_talk:Wankel_Cycle_anim_en.gif as PD, so I believe that you can make slower version if need. Thanks
--Y tambe 02:23, 30 March 2006 (UTC)


Image Tagging Image:Bacillus subtilis Spore.jpg[edit]

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Image Vibrio diagram.png[edit]

I was surprised to learn from your diagram that some Vibrio strains have two types of flagella: a polar flagellum and some thinner peritrichous ones. Please let me know the source of this finding. Thanks in advance, --Brudersohn 20:27, 27 October 2006 (UTC)

Hi. You can find this issue in the reference as follow:
  • George M. Garrity ed. (2005) "Bergey's manual of Systematic Bacteriology", 2nd edition. Vol. 2 Part B, pp. 496-8. ISBN 0-387-24144-2
Briefly, the typical vibrio such as V. cholerae have a polar flagellum with shelth. Some species such as V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus have two type of flagella, and the other species such as V. fischeri have tufts of polar flagella with shelth. My diagram of vibrio was originally intended for the explanation of the article of V. parahaemolyticus in ja, which selected as the featured article in ja. So it only included the V. cholerae- and V. parahamolyticus-type flagella.
V. parahaemolyticus has a special meaning for the microbiology in Japan, because it was originally discovered in Japan (Fujino, 1951) and is one of top 3 pathogen of the food-borne infectious disease in Japan (because it is mainly infected by eating the raw-fish, such as SUSHI and SASHIMI). Some textbooks of microbiology in Japan (e.g. "Toda's New Bacteriology") describes detailly about this bacteria, however, the information of this bacteria in English textbook seems usually poor. So I can easily find the information written in Japanese (including the literatures written by the discoverer), but I don't know about the reference in English (or other languages), except the above one. Thanks. --Y tambe 07:47, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

Question[edit]

Hi. I'd like to use your photo: Image:Plaque_assay_macro.jpg on Citizendium, but they're really strict about permissions, so I was wondering if you would be willing to give us your full name. You can reply on my talk page: User_talk:Joe Quick. Thanks very much. Joe Quick 16:58, 4 May 2007 (UTC)

Coffee roasting grades[edit]

Hi. An image that you uploaded, Coffee roasting grades.png, is in the article Coffee on the English Wikipedia, which is up for FA status. The page says it's from the Japanese Wikipedia, but not where the Japanese Wikipedia got it from. Did you make the image yourself, and if so could you note that on the image page? Thanks, Jude. 23:04, 25 September 2007 (UTC)

Moving bridge images[edit]

Greetings:

Please see en:Moveable_bridge for a visual index that several your images. Do you have any others suitable for use on that section? Alternatively, please describe suitable tools for my use. Thanks, Leonard G. 16:40, 10 February 2008 (UTC)

The new bridge animations are really great! It must have taken either a lot of work or some really great tools to get the w:en:curling bridge right. The new images are now installed in the movable bridge article and have also been distributed to the relevant articles. Did you hand code these or do you have a graphic construction tool? Thank you very much - Leonard

A barnstar for you[edit]

Barnstar-lightbulb3.png Technology Barnstar
In appreciation of your contribution of particularly fine animations of various moveable bridges I hereby award you this Technology Barnstar - Leonard G. 17:22, 23 February 2008 (UTC)

Thank you for the Wankel diagram![edit]

Thank you, thank you. Because I'm a bit of a car nut, many times I have been asked by friends how a Wankel engine works, and many times I have found myself drawing a rough sketch of this on a napkin and trying to explain to them how the rotor divides the space into four chambers that change in size, etc, etc.... Now all I have to do is point them to your animated diagram in Wikipedia, which makes it so easy to understand. Again, thank you. El monty 14:37, 18 March 2008 (UTC)

Bridge animations[edit]

Your bridge animations are great! I wanted to say thank you, I saw them in the different movable bridges articles on En. Is that a Lego person crossing the bridges? IvoShandor 12:15, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

I certainly agree with the preceding writer. I saw one bridge animation in the swedish wikipedia, and I really appreciate it! /--83.191.234.104 22:36, 7 September 2008 (UTC)

Image:Tobacco mosaic virus structure.png[edit]

Hi Y tambe, would you mind confirming that you're indeed the author of this image by adding, if that's indeed the case, an explicit declaration (e.g. something to the effect of "author: Y tambe")? There's interest in including the image in a en.wiki featured article and this is just a "dot the Is and cross the Ts" policy thing. Thanks, Эlcobbola talk 18:23, 19 September 2008 (UTC)

Moving image need for punt and ferry.[edit]

Please consider making moving images for the following orphans:

Moving bridge/Transporter bridge - already done.

Moving bridge/Punt (aka Cable Ferry or Floating transporter bridge)

Moving bridge/Ferry (aka Cableless Punt)

Tabletop (talk) 00:32, 3 March 2009 (UTC)

File:Hemolysis.jpg[edit]

My name is Meghan. I work for an educational textbook publisher. I am working on a health book and the author would like to use this image. What would be the best way to proceed to get permission to use this image. If you could email me back at mhayes @ jbpub.com (please fill in the spaces) that would be great.

Hi. Do you mean File:Hemolysis.jpg? If so, it says right here that you can use the image either under CC-by-sa license or GFDL. CC-by-sa would be easy to use for you, I think. Thanks. --Y tambe (talk) 03:26, 13 May 2009 (UTC)

Yes the image I am referring to is Hemolysis.jpg. It is company policy that we do not print any images without written consent Would you be willing to sign one of our standard permission letter? Thanks!

File:Escherichia coli Gram.jpg[edit]

The file is licensed cc-by so if I want to use it I have to include the name author. But I can not find it. I assume it is you since you uploaded it. But I am not sure. I am working on a tool to convert wikibooks to pdf. And I am currently doing the tests of the license finding algorithms, and they failed at that image, so I tryed myself but I also failed. So it would be cool if you could just add the information template and give the author there Dirk Hünniger (talk) 19:57, 16 June 2009 (UTC)

Thank you for you quick response. That was really nice. Dirk Hünniger (talk) 13:06, 17 June 2009 (UTC)

File:Mycobacterial cell wall diagram.png[edit]

Hello, thanks for the image. I would like to know: from which paper you have the info? You have a reference? Regards. --Ayacop (talk) 10:53, 18 March 2010 (UTC)

The reference is "Toda Shin Saikingaku" (= Toda's New Bacteriology) (2007) 33th ed., Yoshida, S. et al. eds., Tokyo, Nanzando, pp. 630-641. This is the standard textbook for microbiologists in universities in Japan. The original figure (Fig. VII-17-7. p.634), which is inserted in the section of "Chemistry of Bacterial body", is more simple, almost a line-and-box drawing, with Japanese annotation. Three references are cited from the section and one of them is an English book: "Tuberculosis: pathogenesis, protection, and control" (1994), Bloom BR, Washington DC., ASM press. I found a comparable image, although not so similar, in p.297 in this book (from Google Books). Remaining two are a book and an article in Japanese. I hope this would answer your question. Thanks. --Y tambe (talk) 12:08, 18 March 2010 (UTC)
Yes. Thank you. --Ayacop (talk) 10:40, 21 March 2010 (UTC)
BTW, your picture is now used outside of Wikipedia. --Ayacop (talk) 17:32, 22 March 2010 (UTC)

Re: Image of Presynaptic CNTs targets[edit]

Greetings. We would like to reprint your image of presynaptic CNTs (which illustrate SNARE mechanisms) for a professional Powerpoint presentation on BoNT use in cervical dystonia and blepharospasm. The audience is American neurologists and the presentation will be delivered by 2 physician "thought leaders" in BoNT therapy. I am aware that the image is open access, but I want to confirm that this is an original image by you. Because the content of the presentation will be subject to FDA regulatory review guidelines, a more detailed image credit line to go along with the image may be required. Such as: Image credit: name, affiliation. It would be preferable to contact you directly, but I do not see a link to a direct email address on this site. DRapp (talk) 14:51, 20 August 2010 (UTC)

Thank you for your message. You can send me a email from the link labeled 'E-mail this user' in 'Toolbox' in the left-hand column, although the direct email address is hidden here. --Y tambe (talk) 23:50, 20 August 2010 (UTC)

Your bridge animations are the best I've ever seen![edit]

Hullo,

Your moveable bridges are the best animations I've ever seen - clean clear simple and very effective.

May I use them please?

User: Oluremi7 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Oluremi7

Moveable bridge animations[edit]

Hi, I was wondering whether you could make a new animation for tilt bridges. The current animation isn't really an animation of the "general" principle of this sort of bridges (i.e. bridge on lifting arms pivoting around fix hinge points situated a few feet from the bridge span, bridge carrying vehicular traffic), but an animation of the specific example of the Gateshead Millennium Bridge. I have recently expanded the en.wiki article concerning this type of bridges a bit and of the cited examples the Sint-Annabrug in Aalst, Belgium is the one that exhibits this "general mechanism" of tilt bridges most accurately. Tvx1 (talk) 01:15, 30 August 2014 (UTC)