File:History of Stone Veneer.jpg

From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Original file(1,980 × 1,320 pixels, file size: 3.22 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

Summary[edit]

Description
English: Thin stone veneer was first developed in the late 19th century, but there were materials developed much earlier that foreshadowed the use of stone veneer. Parts of the Roman Coliseum were made out of marble veneer that can no longer be seen.

In fact, the holes in structure of the Coliseum are from the anchors of the veneer panels. Structures throughout the Roman Empire were made in part out of stone blocks, including the Segovia aqueduct in Spain, which was made out of granite blocks. People in the Roman Empire also developed concrete (out of cement and rubblestone), which helped builders expand structures greater than before. Stone was used as a part of the facings of these new concrete structures in the Roman Empire, as seen in the Coliseum.

Modern stone veneer first made its appearance in the late 1800s. Faux Stone Panels

The oldest of modern stone veneer product is now disintegrating. It was cut into thick portions and then hand tooled into the appropriate panels; the stones that were used were “granite, marble, travertine, limestone, and slate.” Early in its development, thin stone veneer only had the capabilities to be utilized in areas such as the inside of buildings, street-level facades and storefronts.
Date
Source https://www.flickr.com/photos/c_avery/8262037307/
Author c avery

Licensing[edit]

Checked copyright icon.svg This image was originally posted to Flickr by c avery at https://flickr.com/photos/50253717@N04/8262037307. It was reviewed on by FlickreviewR and was confirmed to be licensed under the terms of the cc-by-sa-2.0.

w:en:Creative Commons

attribution share alike

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.
You are free:
  • to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  • to remix – to adapt the work
Under the following conditions:
  • attribution – You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • share alike – If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.

File history

Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current10:26, 14 June 2016Thumbnail for version as of 10:26, 14 June 20161,980 × 1,320 (3.22 MB)Justinlguss (talk | contribs)User created page with UploadWizard
  • You cannot overwrite this file.

The following page links to this file:

Metadata