File:Water-Lilies-and-Japanese-Bridge-(1897-1899)-Monet.jpg

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Summary[edit]

Claude Monet: Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge  wikidata:Q28777021 
Artist
Claude Monet: Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge
Title
Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge
Object type painting
Description
English: Catalogue Entry:

Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge represents two of Monet’s greatest achievements: his gardens at Giverny and the paintings they inspired. Monet moved to Giverny in 1883 and immediately began to develop the property. For him, the gardens were both a passion and a second artistic medium. His Asian garden was not part of the original estate; it was located on an adjacent property with a small brook, which he purchased and enlarged into a pond for a water garden in 1893. He transformed the site into an inspired vision of cool greens and calm, reflective waters, enhanced by exotic plants such as bamboo, ginkgo, and Japanese fruit trees and a Japanese footbridge. It was not until 1899, however, that he began a series of views of the site, of which this is one.

A careful craftsman who reworked his canvases multiple times, Monet was committed to painting directly from nature as much as possible and for as long as he had the correct conditions; thus, he could work on as many as eight or more canvases a day, devoting as little as an hour or less to each. In this case, he set up his easel at the edge of the water-lily pond and worked on several paintings of the subject as part of a single process.

Monet’s gardens and paintings show the same fascination with the effects of time and weather on the landscape. Both are brilliant expressions of his unique visual sensitivity and emotional response to nature. At Giverny, he literally shaped nature for his brush, cultivating vistas to paint.

Gallery Label:

Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge represents two of Monet’s greatest achievements: his gardens at Giverny and the paintings they inspired. In 1883 the artist moved to the country-town Giverny, near Paris but just across the border of Normandy. This was a time when he was enjoying increasing financial success as an artist, and he immediately began to redesign the property.

In 1893, Monet purchased an adjacent tract, which included a small brook, and transformed the site into an Asian-inspired oasis of cool greens, exotic plants, and calm waters, enhanced by a Japanese footbridge. The serial approach embodied in this work—one of about a dozen paintings in which Monet returned to the same view under differing weather and light conditions—was one of his great formal innovations. He was committed to painting directly from nature as much as possible and whenever weather permitted, sometimes working simultaneously on eight or more canvases a day. Monet’s project to capture ever-shifting atmospheric conditions came to be a hallmark of the Impressionist style.
Date between 1897 and 1899
Medium oil on canvas
QS:P186,Q296955;P186,Q4259259,P518,Q861259
Dimensions Height: 89.7 cm (35.3 in); Width: 90.5 cm (35.6 in)
dimensions QS:P2048,89.7U174728;P2049,90.5U174728

frame: Height: 132.1 cm (52 in); Width: 129.5 cm (50.9 in); Depth: 15.3 cm (6 in)
dimensions QS:P2048,132.1U174728;P2049,129.5U174728;P2610,15.3U174728
European art, Modern art
Accession number
y1972-15
Credit line From the Collection of William Church Osborn, Class of 1883, trustee of Princeton University (1914-1951), president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1941-1947); given by his family
References
Source/Photographer the-athenaeum.org [1]
Permission
(Reusing this file)
This is a faithful photographic reproduction of a two-dimensional, public domain work of art. The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason:
Public domain

The author died in 1926, so this work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less.


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The official position taken by the Wikimedia Foundation is that "faithful reproductions of two-dimensional public domain works of art are public domain".
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Other versions
Claude Monet - Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge - Google Art Project.jpg

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current20:57, 19 January 2009Thumbnail for version as of 20:57, 19 January 20091,031 × 1,001 (381 KB)Krscal (talk | contribs){{Information |Description={{en|1=Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge (1897-1899) by Claude Monet Princeton University Art Museum}} |Source=the-athenaeum.org http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/full.php?ID=3788 |Author=Claude Monet |Date=1897-1899 |Permission=
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