File:American Indians - first families of the Southwest (1920) (14773877544).jpg

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Identifier: cu31924028656738 (find matches)
Title: American Indians : first families of the Southwest
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Huckel, John Frederick, 1863-1936 Harvey, Fred
Subjects: Indians of North America
Publisher: Kansas City, Mo. : F. Harvey
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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)thin wooden walls. It is the most populous village of all the country; we esti-mated there were 15,000 persons in it. That was in 1540, almost four centuries ago and while Coronados historiansexaggerated greatly the population, there is no question that Taos was a large andprosperous pueblo in those days. Today it has a population of about half a thous-and. The reduction in numbers was largely due to the centuries of warfare withwhites as well as with northern Indians. The pueblo is located fifty-eight miles northeast of Santa Fe, New Mex-ico. Unlike the other Pueblo Indians, the men wear their hair in two longplaits, hanging at the sides. They are active agriculturists, own good landsand live in little single room houses on their farms in summer. After harvestthey return to the pueblo. The old houses of the Spanish days are still inuse, and about a portion of the village may be seen remains of the ancientdefensive wall. Digitized by IVIicrosoft®
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TAOS INDIANS ON SCOUTING EXPEDITION Digitized by IVIicrosoft® The Little Indians Have Their Emotions In its joys and momentary griefs the Indian child does not differ much fromits pale face cousin back East or over the water. This little Pueblo girl is brokenhearted over the loss of a striped stick of candy which, needless to say, was replacedbefore the squall fairly began. A bit of candy is a rare luxury for the Indianchildren and they love it almost above everything. The responsibilities of thegirl children begin early; they become nursemaids to younger brothers andsisters before the white child has learned to dress. Meanwhile the boys are atplay^Indian boys have rather an easy time of it. In their strict obedience andreverence for their parents the little Indians set a good example to other children.In turn their parents are very kind, rarely inflicting punishment and seldom whip-ping them except in certain ceremonials when the boys are initiated into theKatcina orders during the

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Flickr tags
  • bookid:cu31924028656738
  • bookyear:1920
  • bookdecade:1920
  • bookcentury:1900
  • bookauthor:Huckel__John_Frederick__1863_1936
  • bookauthor:Harvey__Fred
  • booksubject:Indians_of_North_America
  • bookpublisher:Kansas_City__Mo____F__Harvey
  • bookcontributor:Cornell_University_Library
  • booksponsor:MSN
  • bookleafnumber:28
  • bookcollection:cornell
  • bookcollection:americana
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