File:Groundhog cinder cone.jpg

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Groundhog_cinder_cone.jpg(640 × 425 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

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Description
English: Groundhog cinder cone, the youngest of the Golden Trout Creek volcanic field in California, USA, is breached to the NE. Groundhog cone was the source of a Holocene lava flow that traveled 6 km to the west down Golden Trout Creek The volcanic field consists of a group of Quaternary alkali olivine basaltic cinder cones and lava flows in the Sierra Nevada about 25 km south of Mount Whitney. Lava flows erupted through light-colored Mesozoic granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada batholith visible behind Groundhog cone and on its upper right side.
Date
Source http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1203-17-&volpage=photos&photo=102044
Author Rick Howard (courtesy of Del Hubbs, U. S. Forest Service)
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Public domain
This image is a work of the Forest Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.
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current16:43, 23 May 2010Thumbnail for version as of 16:43, 23 May 2010640 × 425 (75 KB)Michael Metzger (talk | contribs){{Information |Description={{en|1=Groundhog cinder cone, the youngest of the Golden Trout Creek volcanic field, is breached to the NE. Groundhog cone was the source of a Holocene lava flow that traveled 6 km to the west down Golden Trout Creek The volcani
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