South Korea national football team kits

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Kit evolution[edit]

First kits[edit]

1948–1954
1954
1954–1959
1960
1961–1968
1970–1977
Adidas, Kolon Sports, Prospecs, Weekend (1977–1985)[a]
1977
1977–1979[b]
1979
1979–1981
1981–1983
1981–1983
1983
1984–1985
Weekend (1985–1988)
1985
1985–1988
Rapido (1988–1995)
1988–1989
1990
1992–1993
1993[c]
1994[d]
1994–95
1995
1995–1996[e]
Nike (1996–present)
1996–1998[f]
1998–2002[g]
2002–2004[h]
2004–2006
2006–2008
Football kit
2008–2010
Football kit
2010–2012
Football kit
2012–2014
2014–2016
2016–2017
2018–present

Second kits[edit]

1954
1970–1985
1970–1985
1980
Kolon Sports (1983)
1983
Weekend (1985–1988)
1985–1988
Rapido (1988–1995)
1988–1989
1990
1990
1992–1993
1993–1994
1994–1995
1995
1995–1996[e]
Nike (1996–present)
1996–1998[f]
1998–2002[g]
2002–2004[h]
2004–2006
2006–2008
2008–2010
Football kit
2010–2012
Football kit
2012–2014
Football kit
2014–2016
Football kit
2016–2017
Football kit
2018–present

Other combinations[edit]

Rapido (1988–1995)
1994[i]
1994
Nike (1996–present)
2004–2006[j]
2004–2006[k]
2006–2008[l]
2006–2008[m]
Football kit
2008–2010[n]
2008–2010[n]
Football kit
2010–2012[o]
Football kit
2010–2012[p]
Football kit
2012–2014[q]
Football kit
2017–2018[r]
Football kit
2017[s]
Football kit
2017[t]
  1. In this period, various kits are used alternately.
  2. Since 15 June 1997, worn red shorts by 1993
  3. In September 1993, in sight of the 1994 World Cup qualifiers, South Korea changed its uniform to a new one with a colorful pattern supposedly following the trend at the time.[1]
  4. The red uniform was replaced with a white one.
  5. a b At the end of 1995, contract with Rapido ended for the first time, and the contract was signed with Nike. The kits were designed and supplied by Rapido and debuted in the match against Saudi Arabia on October 31, 1995. After signing contract with Nike, South Korea still played friendly matches and the qualifiers for the 1996 Summer Olympics with the same kit as before, with the only difference being the Rapido's logo being covered by a makeshift patch with the Nike logo.
  6. a b According to the designer Tomoko Bando, who designed the Nike's first kits for South Korea, the kit was inspired by w:Taegukgi. This kit was first worn by the Olympic team at the match against Colombia on July 8, 1996. In the 1996 Asian Cup, the shirt number changed from black to white, as well as being made with a shiny fabric. In Japan, this specific kit was referred to as the "Coca-Cola Kit" (コカコーラ・ユニフォーム; Kokakōra Yunifōmu due to the pattern's similarity with the Coca-Cola wave.[2] In the 1996–97 season, during the 1998 FIFA World Cup qualifiers, the South Korean team didn't wear the blue away kit in any of the matches after their defeat against Iran in the w:1996 AFC Asian Cup, where the kit was worn.
  7. a b For four years there were no changes to the basic design, but the only changes made in 2000–01 season were the number font printed and the goalkeeper kit.
  8. a b These were the first kits to bear the KFA emblem in the left chest of the jersey, rather than the Taegukgi. In the 2002 World Cup, almost all of the Nike-sponsored teams had the jerseys in a fluorescent tint, resulting in the South Korean kits being made in a shade of red closer to pink.
  9. In the 1994 World Cup, during the second leg of the group stage against Bolivia, the South Korean team wore a kit combination of the white shirts worn in the match against Spain with the rest of the away blue kit.
  10. At the 2004 Olympics and at the 2005 FIFA World Youth Championship, South Korea wore an all-red combination for the first time in 12 years.
  11. Used on 2006 World Cup qualifier match against Vietnam.
  12. Used on 2006 World Cup group stage match against France.
  13. Used on 2006 World Cup group stage match against Switzerland.
  14. a b Used on 2008 Summer Olympics and 2009 FIFA U-20 World Cup.
  15. Used on 2010 World Cup round of 16 match against Uruguay.
  16. Used in 3 matches in 2011 Asian Cup.
  17. Used in friendly match against Croatia (6 February 2013).
  18. Used in 2018 World Cup qualifier match against Iran and friendly matches against Colombia and Moldova. This combination actually served as home kit main combinations,[3] but only used as early as August 2017.
  19. Used for the 2018 World Cup qualifier match against Uzbekistan.
  20. Used in friendly match against Morocco (10 October 2017).

References[edit]

  1. (28 September 1993). "축구대표 선수복 노랑, 흰색 가미". Error: journal= not stated. w:The Hankyoreh.
  2. Archived copy. Archived from the original on 2015-02-17. Retrieved on 2015-04-21.
  3. https://twitter.com/theKFA/status/712823165592821760

External links[edit]