Swastika

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Swastika symbolizes Peace and Harmony in Hinduism, and has been used in many regions and religions of the world since its origin in the Neolithic period. In the West it is most known for its controversial usage as a Nazi symbol.

Internationalization
العربية: صليب معقوف
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Български: Свастика
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Català: Esvàstica
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Dansk: Svastika
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Eesti: Haakrist
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Ελληνικά: Σβάστικα
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English: Swastika
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Español: Esvástica
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Esperanto: Svastiko
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Français : Svastika
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한국어: 만자
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Hrvatski: Svastika
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Italiano: Svastica
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עברית: צלב הקרס
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Lietuvių: Svastika
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Magyar: Szvasztika
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Македонски: Свастика
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Nederlands: Swastika
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Norsk bokmål: Hakekors
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Norsk nynorsk: Svastika
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Polski: Swastyka
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Português: Suástica
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Română: Svastică
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Русский: Свастика
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Српски / srpski: Свастика
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Srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Svastika
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Suomi: Hakaristi
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Svenska: Svastika
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中文:
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Geometry[edit]

Historical[edit]

Early 20th century[edit]

Western use of the Swastika in the early 20th century

Contemporary Eastern religions[edit]

Nazism and Neo-Nazism[edit]

Nazi symbol

Legal disclaimer
This image shows (or resembles) a symbol that was used by the National Socialist (NSDAP/Nazi) government of Germany or an organization closely associated to it, or another party which has been banned by the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany.

The use of insignia of organizations that have been banned in Germany (like the Nazi swastika or the arrow cross) are also illegal in Austria, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic, France, Brazil, Israel, Ukraine, Russia and other countries, depending on context. In Germany, the applicable law is paragraph 86a of the criminal code (StGB), in Poland – Art. 256 of the criminal code (Dz.U. 1997 nr 88 poz. 553).