User:Kareha/PD-Art

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This is a faithful photographic reproduction of an original two-dimensional work of art. The original image comprising the work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason:
Public domain

This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or less.


Dialog-warning.svg You must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States. Note that a few countries have copyright terms longer than 70 years: Mexico has 100 years, Jamaica has 95 years, Colombia has 80 years, and Guatemala and Samoa have 75 years. This image may not be in the public domain in these countries, which moreover do not implement the rule of the shorter term. Côte d'Ivoire has a general copyright term of 99 years and Honduras has 75 years, but they do implement the rule of the shorter term. Copyright may extend on works created by French who died for France in World War II (more information), Russians who served in the Eastern Front of World War II (known as the Great Patriotic War in Russia) and posthumously rehabilitated victims of Soviet repressions (more information).

This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp. This photograph was taken in the U.S. or in another country where a similar rule applies (for a list of allowable countries, see Commons:When to use the PD-Art tag#Country-specific rules).

This photographic reproduction is therefore also in the public domain.

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How to use the template[edit]

This template is for use by the uploader of a photograph taken by somebody else to assert that the photograph can have no independent copyright as it is simply a faithful reproduction of an old, public domain, two-dimensional work of art. For this purpose, 'faithful reproduction' means a photograph taken perhaps from several metres away from the work of art, with carefully-arranged and professional lighting, filters and so on. Use of this template means that under national law such 'faithful reproduction' photographs can have no copyright, regardless of how much skill and effort went into taking the picture.

Please make sure you understand the difference between a 'faithful reproduction' in this sense and a purely mechanical copy such as a photocopy or a scan taken directly from the original. Images that are no more than mere photocopies or scans directly taken from an old original artwork can be labelled {{PD-Old}}. This template is only for use when the initial reproduction was by means of a photograph for which we have no copyright license.

You should carefully read Commons:When to use the PD-Art tag before using this template. It applies to photographs taken in the U.S. and in some other countries (see Commons:When to use the PD-Art tag#Country-specific rules).

The template takes one parameter to indicate why the original work of art is in the public domain (if no parameter is given, {{PD-old}} is assumed). If you use a parameter, it must correspond to a public domain tag. Do not use as a parameter a copyright license tag such as such as GFDL.

For examples of the tag in use, see Commons:When to use the PD-Art tag#Usage examples.