File:CPM Network Diagram.jpg

From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Original file(739 × 638 pixels, file size: 74 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

Summary[edit]

Description
English: Example of CPM Network Diagram

The critical path method (CPM) has proved a successful method for planning, organizing, and controlling projects. Initially, this management tool outlines the project graphically in the form of a network diagram. This representation, shown in Figure 12-3, illustrates:

  • The required operational sequence,
  • Which operations are concurrent, and
  • Which must be completed before others can be initiated.

CPM operations are referred to as activities.

In Figure 12-3, an example of the application of CPM to the installation of a traffic control system, the activities necessary to complete the project are denoted by a line with an arrowhead. The circled numbers represent events which mark the beginning or completion of an activity. Dashed lines represent dummy activities which do not require any time but must be completed before another event can occur. The number below the activity represents the amount of time required to complete the activity. The critical path represents the project duration. In the example, the critical path is represented by the activities associated with events 1-11-15-19-23-27-29-31.

In the example, if activity 7-21 required a time of 10 instead of 8, then the critical path would become 7-21-23-27-29-31, because this sequence of activities would require a longer time. In this case, the receipt of mast arm poles would establish the critical path because they must be received before they can be set in place.
Date Last modified: January 23, 2009
Source [1] in Traffic Control Systems Handbook: Chapter 12. Design and Implementation
Author United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration

Licensing[edit]

Public domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. Note: This only applies to original works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision. This template also does not apply to postage stamp designs published by the United States Postal Service since 1978. (See § 313.6(C)(1) of Compendium of U.S. Copyright Office Practices). It also does not apply to certain US coins; see The US Mint Terms of Use.
Great Seal of the United States (obverse).svg

File history

Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current10:58, 23 September 2009Thumbnail for version as of 10:58, 23 September 2009739 × 638 (74 KB)Mdd (talk | contribs)image enlarged
09:19, 23 September 2009Thumbnail for version as of 09:19, 23 September 2009471 × 403 (38 KB)Mdd (talk | contribs)== Summary == {{Information |Description={{en|1=Example of CPM Network Diagram The critical path method (CPM) has proved a successful method for planning, organizing, and controlling projects. Initially, this management tool outlines the project graphica
  • You cannot overwrite this file.

The following page links to this file:

File usage on other wikis

The following other wikis use this file: