User:Fentener van Vlissingen/Old maps of Amsterdam

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Cornelis Anthonisz. (1538)[edit]

In 1538, Cornelis Anthonisz. painted the oldest surviving map of Amsterdam. This view of Amsterdam was painted on the order of the city council of Amsterdam.[1]

View of Amsterdam.JPG

Jan Micker (1652)[edit]

Cornelis Anthonisz.' map inspired Jan Micker in 1652 to paint his Bird's Eye View.

Jan Micker - Bird's Eye View of Amsterdam (ca. 1652).jpg

Cornelis Anthonisz. (1544)[edit]

In 1544, Cornelis Anthonisz. made a woodcut based on his earlier painting of Amsterdam.[2]

Cornelis anthonisz vogelvluchtkaart amsterdam.JPG

Pieter Bast (1599)[edit]

Pieter Bast - Amstelodamum urbs Hollandiae primaria emporium totius Europae celeberrimum (1599) 1-1.jpgPieter Bast - Amstelodamum urbs Hollandiae primaria emporium totius Europae celeberrimum (1599) 1-2.jpg
Pieter Bast - Amstelodamum urbs Hollandiae primaria emporium totius Europae celeberrimum (1599) 2-1.jpgPieter Bast - Amstelodamum urbs Hollandiae primaria emporium totius Europae celeberrimum (1599) 2-2.jpg

Balthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode (1625)[edit]

Balthasar Florisz van Berckenrode made this aerial map, comprising nine sheets, in 1625. This map is the most detailed of all wall maps made since the sixteenth century. Van Berckenrode's feat impressed the city's authorities, which bought sixteen copies for the sum of 300 Carolus guilders. The map was reprinted in both 1648 and 1657, with the most important changes to the cityscape added.[3]

Balthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 1-1.jpgBalthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 1-2.jpgBalthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 1-3.jpg
Balthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 2-1.jpgBalthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 2-2.jpgBalthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 2-3.jpg
Balthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 3-1.jpgBalthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 3-2.jpgBalthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) 3-3.jpg

Colour version (1625)[edit]

Balthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam (1625) colour.jpg

Third print (1657)[edit]

Balthasar Florisz. van Berckenrode - Amsterdam.jpg

Joan Blaeu (1649)[edit]

Map of Amsterdam - Amstelodami Celeberrimi Hollandiae Emporii Delineatio Nova (J.Blaeu, 1649).jpg

Daniel Stalpaert (1662)[edit]

Amsterdam1662.jpg

Jacob Bosch (1679)[edit]

Jacob Bosch, an engineer employed by the city of Amsterdam, made a precise drawing of the second part of the canal belt that was laid out from 1662 onwards.[4]

Jacob Bosch - Vierde Uitleg (1679).jpg

Frederick de Wit (1688)[edit]

Amsterdam1688.jpg

Covens and Mortier (1721)[edit]

Amsterdam1748-colour.jpg

Gerrit de Broen (1724)[edit]

Gerrit de Broen's map was the last of the classic wall maps produced of Amsterdam. It was first published in 1724 and had five more editions, published between 1728 and 1794, which were all carefully brought up to date.[5]

Edition of 1737[edit]

Gerrit de Broen - Amsterdam (1737).jpg

Later edition[edit]

Gerrit de Broen - Amsterdam (versie Stadsarchief).jpg

1782 edition[edit]

Gerrit de Broen - Amsterdam (versie Beeldbank NH, 1-1).jpgGerrit de Broen - Amsterdam (versie Beeldbank NH, 1-2).jpg
Gerrit de Broen - Amsterdam (versie Beeldbank NH, 2-1).jpgGerrit de Broen - Amsterdam (versie Beeldbank NH, 2-2).jpg

Jan Mol (1770)[edit]

Amsterdam1770.jpg

References[edit]

  1. Bert Gerlagh (2002). Zwevend boven daken en pleinen. Ons Amsterdam. Retrieved on 23 May 2012.
  2. Oldest map. Stadsarchief Amsterdam. Retrieved on 22 May 2012.
  3. Vogelvluchtkaart. Stadsarchief Amsterdam. Retrieved on 15 May 2012.
  4. Canal ring. Stadsarchief Amsterdam. Retrieved on 22 May 2012.
  5. City extension. Stadsarchief Amsterdam. Retrieved on 22 May 2012.