Commons talk:Welcome to Commons brochure

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Print version[edit]

Version for the first printing

Thanks so, so much to everyone who provided feedback on the drafts of this brochure. Your suggestions, revisions and discussion was really helpful, and thanks to all that, I think we've got a solid brochure to promote Commons.

We've done a small print run, and LiAnna Davis will be showing it off at Wikimania in Hong Kong. If necessary, we can make minor changes based on in-person feedback at Wikimania and any additional feedback here, before doing a larger print run and providing copies for outreach events. So if you spot any problems, please comment.--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 14:12, 2 August 2013 (UTC)

Thank you. I asked and there may be interest by WMIT in translating the brochure, do you plan to share the source file too? Thanks, Nemo 10:58, 5 August 2013 (UTC)
Yes, of course. I'll work on getting the InDesign source uploaded to wikimediafoundation.org soon (I think this is allowed), and I think we'll have the source converted to Scribus as well. If WMIT or anyone else is eager to get started with translation, they can contact me and we can find a way to get the source files to them directly.--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 13:06, 5 August 2013 (UTC)
Here's a zip file of the InDesign source (24MB). Scribus source is still pending.--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 14:35, 15 August 2013 (UTC)
Erf, I had missed this message so I did not ask LiAnna about the brochure :-(
What would you think of pasting the text again here on wiki, so we can translate it using the Translate extension?
Jean-Fred (talk) 16:18, 15 August 2013 (UTC)
That sounds like a good idea. Are you offering to do this?--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 16:25, 15 August 2013 (UTC)
As for setting up the Translate infrastructure and taking part to the translation in French, I am yes. :-)
As for pasting the text, I was hoping you might have the text somewhere already. As I do not have InDesign not sure I can go through the sources either to retrieve the text. In any case, I hope someone will beat me to it ;-)
Jean-Fred (talk) 01:21, 16 August 2013 (UTC)
No, the final text is only in the PDF and source files now, as in the final stages we just passed edits directly to the designer who was working in InDesign. I think the simplest way will be to simply copy and paste from the PDF, which I'll go ahead and do.--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 13:31, 16 August 2013 (UTC)
Okay, I've added all the text that may require translation, with each block of text on its own line. The type will need to be re-set at the line level in InDesign or Scribus for each language, so this is probably the most straightforward form for translation.--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 14:18, 16 August 2013 (UTC)
Excellent, thanks Sage. Translation is ready to be made at Commons:Welcome_to_Commons_brochure/text. Jean-Fred (talk) 14:58, 16 August 2013 (UTC)
Thanks!--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 15:02, 16 August 2013 (UTC)
I made a few formatting tweaks to the source text, and also corrected one typo. Could you mark the newest version for translation? (I also added documentation for some of the messages that might be confusing out of context, such as image credits and Puzzly's captions.)--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 15:37, 16 August 2013 (UTC)
✓ Done Thanks for the work! Jean-Fred (talk) 16:16, 16 August 2013 (UTC)

"Copyright" and "Authors' rights"[edit]

Dear folks, I'm translating the brochure to Spanish. I'm not an expert in translations, and my knowledge on copyright law isn't as good as I need. So, in Spanish we often say "copyright" (with no translation), but people really don't know if it's the same or not as "author rights". I know that author rights include economic rights (such as copyright) and moral rights.

In the brochure, I prefer to say author rights because it includes things like attribution, which don't belong to copyright. However, the brochure often means author rights when it says copyright, so sometimes I don't know which of the two terms I should use.

For example, the fragment 181 says: "Works in the public domain are free of any copyright restrictions whatsoever." As far as I know, works in the public domain still have moral rights in some contries. So I translated that as "free of any commercial rights".

I may have missed other similar situations in the brochure. What do you think? --NaBUru38 (talk) 23:24, 4 September 2013 (UTC)

For the most part, the brochure avoids bringing up authors' rights / moral rights, but we tried to choose the language carefully to avoid conflating copyright with other rights. I'm not a lawyer, but I would say that "free of any commercial restrictions" would be an acceptable form in the example you give. As I understand it, moral rights are quite limited in the United States and some other jurisdictions, compared to Europe where they are more significant. In general, I would suggest that use your best judgment, and also ask a Spanish speaker who deals with copyright to look over the text. Thanks much for your translation!--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 13:38, 5 September 2013 (UTC)

Needs a good Freedom of Panorama section[edit]

This brochure is fine for non-FoP countries, but could downright mislead in countries with robust Freedom of Panorama, by stating things aren't usable that are. Adam Cuerden (talk) 12:40, 15 September 2013 (UTC)

A UK-specific version in in progress, and will cover that. --MichaelMaggs (talk) 20:52, 15 September 2013 (UTC)

What is a free license? page[edit]

On page 10, I might suggest in a future version to change 'modifications' to 'derivatives' or 'adaptations' as legally, not all modifications result in derivative works. Those that don't result in derivative works don't have to be shared-alike (as they are not new works under copyright law).

Thanks for the pointer, Jane. I've changed it in the translation text to "derivative works", and if we do a refresh for the next English printing we'll make that update.--Sage Ross (WMF) (talk) 14:43, 18 November 2013 (UTC)