User talk:Dchordpdx

From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Welcome to Wikimedia Commons, Dchordpdx!

-- Wikimedia Commons Welcome (talk) 03:59, 29 November 2017 (UTC)

Wiki Science Competition[edit]

Thanks for your contributions to the Wiki Science Competition! I just wanted to confirm that you produced the images yourself. Also, have they been published elsewhere before? You can respond by editing below. Thanks! Antony-22 (talk) 22:16, 10 January 2018 (UTC)

Antony: thanks for your work on this project -- what a great forum to merge science and art. Such combinations inspire ideas, and inspired ideas help change the world, one pixel at a time. Indeed, I produced those images as a graduate student at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). None of them were ever published (sadly). They're almost too artistic for the science community to be considered useful data; rather, those are pictures for my apartment walls. And hopefully others' as well.

Let me know if I can provide any other information for you. Keep up the good work, by the way. I realize you largely do what you out of passion, and passion rarely pays. But people notice.

-d.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Dchordpdx (talk • contribs) 05:51, 11 January 2018 (UTC)

Wiki Science Competition prize[edit]

Thanks for the awesome images! Antony-22 (talk) 20:47, 25 January 2018 (UTC)

Antony: I responded to your email with the information you requested, and also sent a follow-up for confirmation. I haven't heard a response so I'll try here. I simply want to ensure you've received my emails.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Dchordpdx (talk • contribs) 06:20, 1 February 2018 (UTC)

Hi Dustin -- neuroscience thoughts[edit]

I had not taken the time to read all of the notes next to the jury awards posting for the Wiki Science Photography competition until recently. I noted that have a significant education, knowledge base, and experience with the scientific method as it relates to research in neurological processes. I also noted that you are a "neighbor" in the NW. I am in Bellevue and have been in the northwest since 1991.

The photo that Wikimedia chose out of the six that you submitted was plain awesome. The astrocyte was shockingly beautiful.

My goal for this year, 2018, is to network as much as I can (and, I am not good at that) to let my colleagues in science and in the practice of psychiatry know about my books, the first significant edition was in 2011 and that was updated in 2013. I won't dive right into the details of why I chose to do a number of things differently than the usual science writer. However, I will say that I did choose to not use a traditional publisher, editor, staff, marketer, etc. I chose to go unplugged, as they say, by self publishing. In other words, what you read is me, and only me. Citations in 2013 book numbered 911. Prior to writing the first edition, I had read deep and wide and thoroughly read over 20,000 pages of primary literature. Now, the count is up to more like 30,000.

I would love to have you and other neuroscientists review my book for what they might already understand, or might begin to understand better from the dots I have connected, which has been called paradigm shifting and ground breaking in terms of understanding the common denominator to both the upside and the downside of what we currently call ADD. Just one bullet point to tease a bit -- logically, the thing we currently call ADD just does not fit the criteria for the term disorder.

My experiment with this book was to see what it would be like to let a book sell itself. No advertising. The two significant editions of the book have been out and read by a few thousand. It has resonated like no other book with those who actually get to experience that ADD brain every day. And, no one has yet even attempted to discredit it, its contents, hypotheses or conclusions. Next time around, which will be soon, I want to use a publisher for the third update of the book. So far, it has been rejected by American Psychiatric Association Publishers and Cambridge.

Okay, probably, that is enough for now. One of the big issues for me in terms of completing three books which are in process is being able to keep a roof over my head while writing. I can tell you this, I was not planning on writing my first paradigm shifting book at age 65 and, then, only because, after doing the extensive reading that I did, I could not allow myself to keep that knowledge and the subsequent insights and connections to myself.

Thank you for your kind consideration of this “out of the blue” email.

Best wishes in your pursuits.

Ron Sterling, M.D.

ronsterling at ronsterling dot com

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Patolocosi (talk • contribs) 04:58, 19 August 2018 (UTC)

--Patolocosi (talk) 19:49, 24 August 2018 (UTC)